More about Fire Danger Ratings

The Fire Danger Rating is an indicator of how dangerous a bushfire could be if it did occur. It is not a predictor of how likely a bushfire is to occur. It should be used as an early indicator to trigger your plans.

You need to understand the Fire Danger Rating to help you assess your level of bushfire risk and to decide what actions to take.

The Bureau of Meteorology forecasts the rating each day. The higher the Fire Danger Rating, the more dangerous the fire conditions.

The Fire Danger Rating chart will help you understand the predicted bushfire behaviour, potential impacts and recommended actions you should take for each category level. We recommend you take the time to review and understand the chart.

Remember:

  • Fires can threaten suddenly and without warning
  • Watch for signs of fire, especially smoke and flames
  • Know the Fire Danger Rating in your area for the day, be aware of local conditions and keep informed
  • Have your Bushfire Survival Plan and kit ready
  • Call 000 to report a fire
  • To find out more
Fire Danger Ratings : what they mean and what you should do
Fire Danger Rating What does it mean? What you should do
CATASTROPHIC
Total Fire Ban
  • These are the worst conditions for a bush or grass fire.
  • If a fire starts and takes hold, it will be extremely difficult to control. It will take significant fire fighting resources and cooler conditions to bring it under control.
  • Spot fires will start well ahead of the main fire and cause rapid spread of the fire. Embers will come from many directions.
  • Homes are not designed or constructed to withstand fires in these conditions.
  • The safest place to be is away from bushfire prone areas.

YOU NEED TO ACT NOW

  • Put your survival first and leave bushfire-prone areas the night before or early in the day – this is your safest option.
  • Act immediately – do not wait and see.
  • Avoid forested areas, thick bush or long, dry grass.
  • Prepare, know and practise a plan for:
    • When you will leave
    • How you will get there
    • What you will do if you cannot leave
    • Where you will go
    • When you will return
EXTREME
Total Fire Ban
  • These are very hot, dry and windy conditions for a bush or grass fire.
  • If a fire starts and takes hold, it will be unpredictable, move very fast. It will be very difficult for fire fighters to bring under control.
  • Spot fires will start and move quickly. Embers may come from many directions.
  • Homes that are prepared to the highest level, have been constructed to bushfire protection levels and are actively defended may provide safety.
  • You must be prepared physically and mentally to defend in these conditions.
  • The safest place to be is away from bushfire prone areas.

YOU NEED TO GET READY TO ACT

  • Only stay with your property if you are prepared to the highest level. This means your home has been constructed to bushfire protection levels - enclosed eaves, covers over external air conditioners, metal flyscreens etc.
  • You must be well prepared and able to actively defend your home. This means you have the right equipment and resources to put out fires around your home - enough water supply, petrol/diesel portable pump, generator, protective clothing etc.
  • If you are not prepared to the highest level, leaving bushfire prone areas early in the day is your safest option.

SEVERE
Total Fire Ban

  • These are hot, dry and possibly windy conditions for a bush or grass fire.
  • If a fire starts and takes hold, it will be hard for fire fighters to bring under control.
  • Well-prepared homes that are actively defended can provide safety.
  • You must be prepared physically and mentally to defend in these conditions.

YOU NEED TO BE AWARE

  • Well-prepared homes that are actively defended can provide safety. This means you have the right equipment and resources to put out fires around your home - enough water supply, petrol/diesel portable pump, generator, protective clothing etc.
  • If you are not prepared, leaving bushfire prone areas early in the day is your safest option.

VERY HIGH

  • If a fire starts, it is likely to be controlled in these conditions and homes can provide safety.
  • Be aware of how fires can start and reduce the risk.
  • Check your Bushfire Survival Plan.
  • Monitor conditions.
  • You may need to act.
  • Leave if necessary.

HIGH

LOW - MODERATE