Fact Sheet Library

Below are fact sheets and brochures providing more detailed information to help you create your Bushfire Survival Plan.

A PDF list of all our fact sheets can be found here.

Fact Sheet Section 01 - Planning to Survive a Bushfire (7)
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.01 - Prepare. Act. Plan to Survive
Being Bushfire Ready is a shared responsibility between the Government, fire agencies and the community. If you live, work or travel in an area where bushfires can occur, then you need to prepare a bushfire survival plan ahead of time and practise it regularly. Ensure that you are well prepared and stay well informed to assist you in making decisions to improve your safety and chances of survival.
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.02 - 7 Keys to survival
There are seven keys to bushfire survival. It is recommended that you review these and your circumstances as part of developing your Bushfire Survival Plan.
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.03 - Plan Now To Stay And Defend Or Leave Early
Bushfires threaten life and property throughout South Australia each summer. Making the right decision to ‘stay and defend ‘or ‘leave early’ for yourself and your family is critical for your safety and survival.
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.04 - Planning to leave early
Planning to leave early requires planning and consideration, you need to understand what the triggers are to leave and know what actions you should take before leaving.
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.05 - Planning To Stay And Defend
If you are planning to stay and defend your property, then you will need to prepare your property and yourself throughout the year. It is important that you consider the Fire Danger Rating when considering whether to stay and defend your property. Checking the daily Fire Danger Rating should be included in your Bushfire Survival Plan.
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.06 - Bushfire Safer Places
If you live, work or travel in an area where bushfires can occur, and your Bushfire Survival Plan is to leave early, on or before a bad fire day, you need to be aware of where you can relocate to. CFS has developed a hierarchy of places that can offer relative safety from bushfire. They are broken into two categories, and are called Bushfire Safer Places and Last Resort Refuges. It is important that you know what each of these are, where they are, and what risk you may be exposed to if you use one of these options during a bushfire.
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CFS Fact Sheet 1.07 - On the day of a bushfire
The most important thing on fire danger days is to be alert to what is going on around you. Most of your preparatory actions will be the same whether you are leaving early or staying and defending.
Fact Sheet Section 02 - Understanding Bushfires and Warnings (7)
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.01 - Bushfire Behaviour In Detail
Once a fire is burning, its behaviour is determined by three main factors.
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.02 - Fire Ban Districts and Fire Danger Season
South Australia is divided into 15 Fire Ban Districts. Each district has its own fire danger season dates, so it is important to be aware of which district you live, travel or work in.
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.03.1 - Fire Danger Days and Ratings
The Fire Danger Season runs from November to April, but the exact dates vary according to the dryness of the soil and vegetation, which is monitored by the CFS. During the Fire Danger Season restrictions, are placed on lighting fires to reduce the chance of bushfires starting. You must apply for a permit to light fires outdoors at this time unless the fire is of a type prescribed in the Fire and Emergency Services Act and Regulations.
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.05 - Bushfire Advice and Warning Messages
Fire can threaten suddenly and without warning so you should always be ready to act. The CFS will provide as much information as possible to help you make an informed decision however you may not always receive an official warning directly.
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.06 - Emergency Broadcast Partners
More media outlets than ever before are committing to broadcast vital warning information during bushfires, by partnering with the SA Country Fire Service (CFS). These Emergency Broadcast Partners have signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the CFS, indicating their support to broadcast of Watch and Act and Emergency Warning messages to at-risk communities during bushfires.
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.07 - Ways to stay informed
There are more ways than ever to stay informed about bushfires.
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CFS Fact Sheet 2.08 - Understanding Aerial Firefighting
At times, firefighting operations may be supported by firefighting aircraft and/or earth moving plant and equipment. Firefighting aircraft are a limited resource and therefore CFS places these aircraft in locations where life and assets are at the highest risk. There is no guarantee that every fire in the State will be serviced by aircraft, and the primary form of fire suppression has, and will always be, firefighters on the ground.
Fact Sheet Section 03 - Preparing Yourself (4)
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CFS Fact Sheet 3.01 - Preparing yourself for bushfires
Preparing yourself and your property to survive a bushfire requires thought and planning. With a written and practised Bushfire Survival Plan and a well-maintained home there is a much better chance of surviving a bushfire. Your Bushfire Survival Plan also needs to consider how you and your family will be affected – both physically and emotionally.
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CFS Fact Sheet 3.02 - How people die in bushfires and how they survive
Fires can be very frightening, and may make it hard to think clearly or make good decisions. Sometimes people find out too late they don't have essential resources to enact their plans. It is vital that you have a written and practised Bushfire Survival Plan.
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CFS Fact Sheet 3.03 - Emergency kits
Emergency kits consist of all the things you will need to perform the actions in your Bushfire Survival Plan. You won't know exactly what should be in your kit until your preparation work is done and your plan is written. Emergency kits should be prepared before the fire season. The best emergency kit is one that can be used for all hazards – not just bushfires.
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CFS Fact Sheet 3.04 - After the fire
Survival isn't just about what happens during the fire, it's also about how well you recover in the days, weeks and years after the fire.
Fact Sheet Section 04 - Preparing your Property (11)
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.01 - Preparing your property
Preparation throughout the year is an essential key to ensure that you, your property and your family survive a bushfire. A well prepared home is more likely to survive a bushfire than one that hasn’t been prepared. Even if you are not around there is a greater chance that your home will survive if you have undertaken the correct preparations.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.02 - How houses burn
Building fires start in the same way as bushfires – with small ignitions. These ignitions progress slowly at first, accelerate and progressively involve the whole building. During a bushfire, buildings can ignite in three ways; through ember attack, direct flame contact and radiant heat.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.03 - Identifying hazards around your home
Your home is more likely to survive a bushfire if you have prepared it properly. The most important job is to create a defendable space, which is an area around your home where you have modified the vegetation and removed most of the other flammable materials to reduce the fire’s intensity. Removing flammable materials will mean sparks and embers will have less fuel to ignite, and any spot-fires will be easier to put out. Also, the impact of the flames and radiant heat from an approaching bushfire will be reduced. A defendable space makes it much easier to defend your home.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.04 - House siting and design
When buying land or property in rural or urban fringe areas it is important to consider the level of fire hazard in the district. When deciding on a site on which to build in such areas, take care to choose a position that is relatively safe.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.06 - Fuel breaks
A fuel break is an area where vegetation has been removed or modified to reduce the risk of bushfires starting and to assist in reducing the intensity and rate of spread of bushfires should one start. Fuel breaks provide protection from the fire for people, equipment and property, and provide an edge from which fire crews can undertake fire suppression or prescribed burning activities.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.08 - Fire fighting equipment
Adequate, accessible water storage and an effective way of distributing it are key to extinguishing spot fires.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.09 - Sprinkler systems
Fire protection of a property cannot rely on one factor; there will always be a number of measures which, when combined, will provide the best fire protection. However, when homes are located in areas of extreme fire danger, an external sprinkler system should be considered as an important part of your total bushfire survival plan.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.10 - Bunkers
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.12 - Bushfire safety for renters
Renters do not generally have the same freedom to make alterations around their home and surrounds as do people who own their own properties. It can therefore appear more difficult to prepare for bushfire. This does not mean that you can’t make plans and preparations for bushfire safety.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.14 - Burning off
Burning off is only one of a selection of vegetation management practices that are regularly used by the farming community. However it is a high risk farming practice if not conducted properly and should be undertaken with extreme caution.
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CFS Fact Sheet 4.15 - Chaff Pile and Stubble Dump burning
Chaff Pile and Stubble Dump burning is a common farming practice that is used through the state. During the Fire Danger season this practice poses a risk to fire escape and the following information has been developed as a reccommended practice.
Fact Sheet Section 05 - Pets Horses and Livestock (3)
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CFS Fact Sheet 5.01 - Care of pets and livestock
The care and transport of pets and livestock prior to, during and after the passage of fire is rarely mentioned in any advice or information regarding bushfire prevention and safety. But the loss of a loved pet is usually, especially for children, just as upsetting as the loss of a home and personal possessions. The heartache can be avoided if; when developing a bushfire survival plan that pets and other livestock are included.
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CFS Fact Sheet 5.02 - Horses and bushfire
There are steps that horse owners can take to prepare themselves in case their property is threatened by bushfires. The key to survival is forward planning and self-reliance.
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CFS Fact Sheet 5.03 - Protection of fodder reserves
Haystacks, haysheds and silos must be well sited and well protected from wildfire, with properly prepared and maintained fuel breaks. The reserves they contain may be the only stock feed available after a large fire.
Fact Sheet Section 06 - Machinery Storage Permits and Restrictions (3)
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CFS Fact Sheet 6.05 - Permits
Permits are used for controlling high risk activities during the Fire Danger Season.
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CFS Fact Sheet 6.06 - Restrictions (what can I do / what can't I do)
Once the Fire Danger Season has begun there are strict controls on the lighting of fires and the use of certain tools in the open. The restrictions remain in place until the end of the season. When a Total Fire Ban Day is declared, there are further restrictions to what you can do.
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CFS Fact Sheet 6.07 - Building and using pizza ovens
The key to correct construction of a wood fired pizza oven is to prevent any sparks and embers from escaping to start a fire.
Fact Sheet Section 07 - Preparing your Business (1)
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CFS Fact Sheet 7.01 - Bushfire safety for organisations and business
All businesses, organisations and individuals who work in or visit bushfire prone areas need to develop and implement their own Bushfire Safety policies, plans and procedures.
Fact Sheet Section 09 - Surviving While Travelling and on Holidays (2)
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CFS Fact Sheet 9.01 - Campfires and barbeques
It's important to remember that fire restrictions may affect what you can and can't do with regards to campfires and barbecues. Campfires and barbeques can be used throughout the year but during the Fire Danger Season certain restrictions apply. Further restrictions apply on Total Fire Ban days so you will need to be aware if there is a Total Fire Ban in place in the area where you plan to light your fire.
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CFS Fact Sheet 9.02 - Caravan & Camping Bushfire Safety
If travelling during the bushfire season, you could be affected by a fire. Bushfires can start suddenly and spread quickly - without warning. Before setting off on your caravan or camping trip make sure you have all the information you will need to keep safe.
Fact Sheet Section 10 - Aerial Firefighting (4)
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CFS Fact Sheet 10.01 - Understanding aerial firefighting
At times, firefighting operations may be supported by firefighting aircraft and/or earth moving plant and equipment. Firefighting aircraft are a limited resource and therefore CFS places these aircraft in locations where life and assets are at the highest risk. There is no guarantee that every fire in the State will be serviced by aircraft, and the primary form of fire suppression has, and will always be, firefighters on the ground.
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CFS Fact Sheet 10.02 - Single engine air tanker
The AT-802 is the largest firefighting single engine air tanker in the world today. This aircraft is a modern, turboprop "initial attack air tanker" that is fast, manoeuvrable, cost-effective and perfectly complements the CFS's "rapid initial attack" bushfire strategy.
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CFS Fact Sheet 10.03 - Type 1 (High Volume) Helicopter - Erickson Aircrane S-64E
The Erickson Air-crane S-64E is a heavy vertical lift helicopter capable of delivering high volumes of water and suppressant to a bushfire, given access to an appropriate water source such as a large dam, lake, or reservoir.
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CFS Fact Sheet 10.04 - Aerial firefighting products
All firebombing aircraft in the CFS fleet have the ability to drop water with aerial firefighting product additives. Aerial Firefighting Products are added to the water in the aircrafts tank to increase the effectiveness of firebombing drops.